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the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged about. they're describe this as a power grab by mr. morsi. does it seem that most people understand that and does it make a difference at all? >> reporter: no. they reject that position by mr. morsi, and that explains the outrage. dramatic scenes in tahrirr square, including alexandria and port sayid. these are reminiscent of what we saw last year. it was then aimed at then president hosni mubarak. today the fury is aimed at mr. morsy. >> they were throwing rocks and monthly taf cocktails. the security forces shooting tear gases in the air. very similar scenes to last year. a similar slogan as well, fred. last year we heard the protests, the slogan, leave, leave, leave. we're hearing it again today. people saying they're not
. what should the united states of america do? saying this unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is fragile but this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> chris: let's talk about that because morsi took his steps ours after secretary of state hillary clinton praised him for helping to broker the peace deal between hamas and israel and the administration issued the state department a tepid criticism. how tough should they get? should they say you have to pull back? what should our demands and leverage be? >> our leverage is not only substantial bayance and aid, plus an imf deal but the marshaling world public opinion is also against this kind of move by mr. morsi. we appreciate president morsi's action but in the past it's always been the united states that's brokered these deals and there's a clear perception amongst hamas that they won on this one. unfortun
and thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is, by the way, incredibly fragile but is not what is acceptable, what the american taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy, which you promised the people of egypt, when your party and you were elected president. >> chris: let's talk about that. because, morsi took his step hours after secretary of state clinton praised him for helping broker the deal between hamas and israel and so far, at least the administration issued, the state department, a tepid criticism. how tough should they get with them? directly say pull back, what should our demands an leverage be? >> our leverage is obviously, not only the substantial billions in aid we provide, plus, debt forgiveness and an i. -- an imf deal, but the marshalling world publish opinion is against this kind of move by mr. morsi. we appreciate president morsi's action but it always in the past the united states that brokered the deals and there is a clear perception at least amongst hamas that they won on this one. and, un
or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his
're determined to stay here until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. here's what one protester had to say. >> translator: i completely reject the constitutional decree that was announced last there's by the president because it gives president morsi is powers of a new pharaoh in egypt. actually, there was never a pharaoh like this before because ousted president hosni mubarak, with all his arrogance and dictatorial tendencies, never gave himself the power that no one can appeal his decisions. >> reporter: the opposing factions don't look like they're backing down, martin, neither does the muslim brotherhood and the president. that's why this looks to be an intensifying situation in the days ahead. >> reza, the president has said this decree is only temporary. what does he mean by that? >> reporter: well, this was his attempt to placate his opponents and his critics. he released the statement saying that these decrees are temporary only until a parliament is formed. and this all-important new constitution is drafted. he says this is an effort to keep the old recommend nantds of the mubarak
in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking on fighters that are smuggling weapons in, and they see israel as an illegal occupying force for more than 40 yea
point out, there's been a 33-year-old peace pact with the israelis and with egypt perhaps mr. morsi will be loathe to push the eswriptian military any way to break that at all, and, of course, on top of that president morsi has to bear in mind significant aid packages from the west and from the imf, which he needs badly so his country's heavily damaged economy can begin to recover. many issues, he certainly faces there, but, of course, he must tread that fine line between the international role egypt must maintain and the stability and, of course, keeping popular opinion inside egypt satisfied. many expecting egypt to perhaps come to a greater level of assistance for hamas at this point, suzanne. >> just minutes ago we saw the authority, the president of mahmoud abbas saying they are denying palestinians the right to establish an independent state, taking a really hard line there. you also say the israeli military putting out this statement an hour ago saying they're going to operate so the mission has been complete and that hamas has now turned the gaza strip into a base for the ir
? >> dialogue. >> reporter: they want dialogue. they want concessions. they want mr. morsi to rescind his decrees. what kind of concessions are you willing to make? . >> the decision is up to the president. not up to us. we are ready for dialogue with our -- >> reporter: are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of those decrees? >> decree is up to the president, accepting it -- we may have some reservations. but as a whole, we must take a step forward, not backward. >> reporter: so two big headlines coming out of egypt today, first off, president morsi not scaling back his decrees, sticking with them and the muslim brotherhood calling off their 1 million-man demonstration scheduled for tomorrow. >> we'll have a lot more on this story coming up later this hour. thanks very much, reza sayah, from cairo. >>> other news we're following, including news from afghanistan as the united states looks to wind down its troop strength in afghanistan, plans are being made for a u.s. military force to stay on there even after the 2014 handover to afghan authorities. our pentagon correspon
in a show of force, in a show of opposition, against mr. morsi. of course, all of these protests started last thursday when he announced these particular decrees. they hope with this kind of pressure, he's going to pull back. so far, suzanne, he hasn't. >> tell us about this group here. is it largely peaceful? we understand that there was a report that a protester died in tahrir square today. what do we know? >> reporter: suzanne, we did have a fatality today. we should tell you, most of these demonstrators are peaceful. they're out here chanting slogans, very much like they did in the 2011 uprising. but on the side streets leading into tahrir square, there is violence. sometimes those clashes get ugly. these are clashes mostly triggered by teenagers, 20-somethings, who throw rocks at police, police respond by firing tear gas, and today we did have a fatality, a man in his 60s, according to the health ministry, was killed when he suffocated from excessive tear gas. >> very quickly here, is there any response from the egyptian government to all of this taking place in the square? >> repor
president morsi, closed the deal as this official said. they also praised secretary clinton saying that she did an exceptional job. but again going back to what they are saying as mr. obama was very directly involved. one of the things also, wolf, that they're pointing at that i think will prove to be very important is this burgeoning relationship with the egyptian president morsi. i mean, just think of it. just a short time ago he was the new man on the block, muslim brotherhood, lots of doubts about him. and now look at the words that the president used. there's a lot of praise for his personal role in bringing about this cease-fire. that could go a long way. in fact, they say that he was very pragmatic. that's president morsi, very pragmatic. they developed a relationship they say based on trust and were able to work through these issues. so down the road that's going to be important, wolf. >> basically the bottom line in all of this is that the u.s. is also, jill, provided some assurances to both the israeli government of prime minister netanyahu and the egyptian government of president
, secretary clinton did call the foreign minister of egypt, mr. amr, and tried to get some clarification. they discussed this not only this political issue of president morsi, but the issue of gaza, where he played a very important role, and that is why secretary clinton was in that region, just last week. but the -- there is concern and let's listen to what the spokesperson for the state department, victoria newland, had to say about it. >> it is a very murky uncertain period in terms of the legal and constitutional underpinnings, which makes it all the more important that the process proceed on the basis of democratic dialogue and consultation. >> so if it is murky, they are watching it very, very closely. in fact, one thing that victoria nuland said, the right people are talking to each other. that's good news. they want this to happen, number one, peacefully, and number two, democratically. and, you know, brooke, on another issue that funding the imf, of course, just reached an agreement with egypt on some badly needed funds that they needed, and there is a question also here in the
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)